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The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week LIVE! (Mar. 30 at 7PM : #stayhome edition)

Watch a live recording of PopSci’s hit podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week and #stayhome to help stop the spread of COVID-19. After all, you might as well #learn something weird while you’re stuck inside. (This weird, wild, and wondrous video is a part of YouTube’s #stayhome and #learn #withme initiative.) SUBSCRIBE! for…

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Watch a live recording of PopSci’s hit podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week and #stayhome to help stop the spread of COVID-19. After all, you might as well #learn something weird while you’re stuck inside. (This weird, wild, and wondrous video is a part of YouTube’s #stayhome and #learn #withme initiative.)

SUBSCRIBE! for more Popular Science on YouTube ►►

So, what’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you tune in for this live show in partnership with our pals at CAVEAT. But why stop there? The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple, Anchor, and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every-other Wednesday morning. It’s your new favorite source for the strangest science-adjacent facts, figures, and Wikipedia spirals the editors of Popular Science can muster.

All you have to do is sit back, sip a quarantini, and let them spin their little science yarns for you.

Live show hosts:
Rachel Feltman
Claire Maldarelli
Jessica Boddy
Purbita Saha
Stan Horaczek

SUBSCRIBE! to Weirdest Thing on Apple ►►

Check us out on Anchor, too ►►

Learn more about Caveat, the place to be for New York City’s nerds ►►

Caveat livestreams are presented as pay-what-you-can. If you’re able we’d very much appreciate the cost of a ticket and a drink so they can support their staff and performers:

#stayhome #withme #learn #withme #popsci #popularscience #theweirdestthingilearnedthisweek #weirdestthing #weird #live #livestream #COVID19 #coronavirus #science #learning #education #edu #podcast #caveat

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. darkraider origins

    March 31, 2020 at 4:16 am

    pls subscribe and view my channel . i am a new youtuber

    • darkraider origins

      March 31, 2020 at 4:16 am

      your video was really fascinating.

  2. Elise Contarsy

    April 28, 2020 at 6:43 pm

    This is fantastic! Great show.

  3. Devils God

    November 10, 2020 at 9:11 pm

    Hey fellas! A huge fan of yours. Love from India!!! 1st of all a very happy Diwali to my bong sis Purbita!!! And to others pre thanksgiving wishes :)XOXO
    I hope you grow more and more. Have been binge listening to you you guys amidst this pandemic and have grown to be a huge admirer. If possible please do try a episode or a weird fact related to India and market or collab with someone here. Your facts and knowledge will be a huge plus point for my fellow Indians also we will be a huge plus for your follower base.
    Stay safe!
    love : Balvirsinh Gadhvi.

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Popular Science

What happens to your body when you die in space?

NASA isn’t sure what to do with corpses in space, but they may need to figure it out soon. Of the more than 550 people we’ve sent into the cosmos, just 21 have died—and only 3 actually above the boundary between Earth and space—since humankind first took to strapping ourselves to rockets. When there have…

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NASA isn’t sure what to do with corpses in space, but they may need to figure it out soon.

Of the more than 550 people we’ve sent into the cosmos, just 21 have died—and only 3 actually above the boundary between Earth and space—since humankind first took to strapping ourselves to rockets. When there have been fatalities, the entire crew has been lost, leaving no one to rescue. But as we move closer to a human mission to Mars, there’s a higher likelihood that individuals could be stranded or even perish—whether that’s on the way, while living in harsh environments, or at some other point of the mission.

**Correction: April 15, 2021
The video misstates the distance from Earth to the Moon. It is 250,000 miles, not 250 miles.**

► DO YOU LOVE DOGS? WHAT ABOUT SPACE? Watch our video about Laika, our hero ​

► HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED how an eclipse happens?

► 24 OF THE MOST FAMOUS SPACE LAUNCHES EVER

► THE MOLE CHANGED. And now new discoveries throughout space and time are possible

► FIND OUT MORE about this episode by reading the article

► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science on YouTube

***
About Ask Us Anything
Popular Science answers your most outlandish, mind-burning questions—from what the universe is made of to why not everyone can touch their toes.

Media
Assignment: Outer Space (1960), Canadian Space Agency, Destination Earth (1956), European Space Agency, Galaxy Science Fiction, NASA/JPL, Prelinger Archives, Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, U.S. National Archives

Music
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#AskUsAnything #whathappenstoyourbodyifyoudieinspace #PopularScience #space #PopSci #science #space #spacex #nasa #nasaperseverance #nasaspaceflight #spacehistory #spacevideos #whathappenstoyourbodyifyoudieinspace #whathappenstoyourbodywhenyoudie #askusanything #astronaut #spacewalk #apollo11 #moonlanding #apollo11launch #elonmusk #cosmos #vintagespace #spacearchive #mars #marsroverlanding #marsrover #curiosityrover #perseverancerover #spacetravel #deepspace #shuttlelaunch #buzzaldrin #neilarmstrong #chrishadfield

– [Narrator] On July 21st, 1969,

the Apollo 11 lunar landing crew.

– That’s one small step for man.

– [Narrator] Was due to
depart the moon’s surface

after a 22 hour visit.

– One giant leap for mankind.

– [Narrator] A speech had been prepared

for President Richard Nixon titled,

“In the Event of Moon Disaster,”

it read, “Fate has ordained that the men

who went to the moon to explore in peace

will stay on the moon to rest peace”

Said another way, marooned, stranded

because landing on the moon was one thing,

(gentle music)

getting off was something else entirely.

Would Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong

live out the rest of their days

staring at the blue glow of
Earth from 250,000 miles away?

And what if they did?

(gentle music)

Of the more than 550 people
we’ve sent into the cosmos,

just 21 have died

and only 3 actually above the boundary

between Earth and space

since humankind first took

to strapping ourselves to rockets.

When there have been fatalities,

the entire crew has been lost,

leaving no one to rescue.

But as we move closer to
a human mission to Mars,

there’s a higher likelihood

that individuals could be
stranded or even perish

whether that’s on the way,

while living in harsh environments,

or at some other point of the mission.

The International Space Station

is one place to look to as a model.

A death among that crew

would likely result from an
accident during a spacewalk.

Maybe suddenly you get
hit by a micrometeorite,

then there’s a hole in your suit.

Well, this hypothetical astronaut

would only have about 15 seconds

until they lost consciousness.

Before they froze, they
would most likely die

from asphyxiation or decompression.

10 seconds of exposure
to the vacuum of space

would force the water in their
skin and blood to vaporize,

while their body expanded
outward like a balloon.

Their lungs would collapse,

and after 30 seconds
they would be paralyzed

if they weren’t already dead.

A corpse in space presents
some major logistical problems.

The fact that a dead body is a biohazard

is definitely the biggest concern,

and finding the space to
store it in is a close second.

The crew of the ISS already stores trash

in the coldest spot on the station;

it keeps the bacteria away and
makes smell less of an issue.

For this reason, a dead astronaut
would likely be held here

or an airlock until a seat was available

on a return trip to Earth.

What if you’re millions
of miles from anywhere,

en route to Mars,

and storage of a deceased
astronaut isn’t an option?

In theory, you could
always jettison them out

on a forever path into the void, right?

One problem of physics though,

unless a mini rocket was
strapped to the body,

they would end up following the trajectory

of the spacecraft.

As the years went on and
the bodies accumulated,

that would make for a morbid trip.

But the risks of dying along the way

are nothing compared to
dying once you get there.

In promoting his own future
space settlement plans,

SpaceX’s Elon Musk has
openly cautioned that, quote,

“If you want to go to
Mars, prepare to die.”

Which begs the question,

if lives are lost on the Red Planet,

where do you put the bodies?

Could they just be buried there?

That makes sense because
of the long journey back,

but it poses potential
contamination problems.

Even the Mars rovers are required by law

not to bring Earth microbes
to their new planet.

Spacecraft are repeatedly
cleaned and sanitized

before launch to help prevent
potentially habitable locales

from being overtaken by
intrepid microorganisms.

But the bugs on a rover are nothing

compared to the bacteria
hitching a ride on a dead body.

So, if a Martian burial were to happen,

it would have to require cremation.

(gentle music)

NASA never officially
published a contingency plan

for the Apollo moon-walkers in 1969,

but they were prepared to lose the crew.

If things went sideways,

they planned to shut down communication

with the stranded astronauts

and issue them a formal burial at sea.

In reality, starvation
or, unfortunately, suicide

would have been the cause of death.

But even given that morbid
hypothetical turn of events,

everyone knew we would keep trying.

Quote, “Others will follow, and
surely find their way home.”

Nixon’s back-up speech read.

“Man’s search will not be denied.

But these men were the first,

and they will remain the
foremost in our hearts.”

As for future Mars missions,

climbing Mount Everest provides
the perfect Earthly analogy,

more than 200 bodies
lay across the mountain,

some of them still visible on
days when snow cover is light.

Everyone who climbs past is reminded

that they’re risking their lives.

Indeed, going to Mars is a risk.

But, that’s part of exploring space.

(gentle music)

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Popular Science

What Makes an ‘Ultra High Performance’ Tire? These 3 Things

What makes an ‘Ultra High Performance’ tire? Popular Science finds out by testing Continental’s new ExtremeContact DWS06 Plus. Video presented by Continental. ► LEARN MORE about how tires work in winter: ► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science on YouTube: #Continental #ExtremeContactDWS06Plus #highperformance #science #engineering #tire #ContinentalTire #howtireswork #cars #trucks #suv #gripperformance #trackingstability #traction #breaking #howtireswork #howstuffworks…

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What makes an ‘Ultra High Performance’ tire? Popular Science finds out by testing Continental’s new ExtremeContact DWS06 Plus.

Video presented by Continental.

► LEARN MORE about how tires work in winter:

► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science on YouTube:

#Continental #ExtremeContactDWS06Plus #highperformance #science #engineering #tire #ContinentalTire #howtireswork #cars #trucks #suv #gripperformance #trackingstability #traction #breaking #howtireswork #howstuffworks #Sponsored #ContinentalTire #wetroad #newtire #gripperformance #trackingstability #traction #breaking #steering #ultrahighperformance #allseasontires #optimumgrip #sportplustechnology #xsipes #forcevectoring #brakingdistance #tirerubber #performance #tiretechnology

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Popular Science

Get a grip: the science of how tires work in winter

What keeps the tire’s rubber on the road when the weather becomes most foul, the temperature drops, and rain turns to sleet and then snow? A good winter tire requires these three things. Video presented by Continental. ► LEARN MORE about how tires work in winter: ► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science on YouTube: #Continental #VikingContact7…

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What keeps the tire’s rubber on the road when the weather becomes most foul, the temperature drops, and rain turns to sleet and then snow? A good winter tire requires these three things.

Video presented by Continental.

► LEARN MORE about how tires work in winter:

► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science on YouTube:

#Continental #VikingContact7 #wintertire #science #engineering #tire #ContinentalTire #howtireswork #cars #trucks #suv #gripperformance #trackingstability #traction #breaking

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