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The Love Life of the Horseshoe Crab | A mating ritual 450 million years old || Wild Lives ep. 3

A MATING RITUAL 450 MILLION YEARS OLD. When you first see a horseshoe crab, it’s impossible to tell if it’s even alive. But as the tide eats away at the coastline along the eastern seaboard each spring, and the sun sets over the horizon, these seemingly-dead creatures come to life with one singular purpose: to…

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A MATING RITUAL 450 MILLION YEARS OLD. When you first see a horseshoe crab, it’s impossible to tell if it’s even alive. But as the tide eats away at the coastline along the eastern seaboard each spring, and the sun sets over the horizon, these seemingly-dead creatures come to life with one singular purpose: to mate.

Horrific creature? Maybe—but only if you look at its underbelly. From above, it’s really just a bicycle helmet looking for love. Learn all about the wild mating rituals and weird reproductive cycle of the horseshoe crab.

► WATCH! every single episode of WILD LIVES here:

► THIS IS THE MOST INTERESTING LION IN THE WORLD. After all, how many lions have movies and songs made about them because of never before seen animal behavior? Just one lion—Frasier, the Sensuous Lion… I mean, how is fathering 35 cubs when you’re 20 lion years old even possible?!:

► LIKE, THIS REALLY HAPPENED. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic THE BIRDS is, in part, inspired by a very real phenomenon that occurred in Santa Cruz, California in 1961. One night, inexplicably, thousands of sooty shearwater birds lost their minds, dive-bombing into homes and even biting people. But, for 50 years, no one knew why… That is, until now. This is a Hitchcockian mystery wrapped in a scientific paper—a biological whodunnit:

► HAVE YOU EVER WONDERED about what makes an animal hibernate? PopSci formed an orchestra of hibernating animals to tell you about their winter’s sleep:

► DID YOU KNOW the first underwater film ever recorded was lost to history until PopSci found it mislabeled in a Dutch archive? It’s a story too strange to be fiction (and, yes, it involves a shark and a horse). Also, it’s the first footage of a shark ever recorded:

► DO YOU LOVE DOGS? WHAT ABOUT SPACE? Watch our video about Laika, our hero:

► SUBSCRIBE! to Popular Science for more WILD LIVES on YouTube: …

In their own words. Well, approximately their own words—they are wild animals after all.

CREDITS
Video by: Tom McNamara & Eleanor Cummins
Animation: Beth Wexler
Narrator: Elizabeth Ollier
Executive Producer: Amy Schellenbaum
Editor-in-Chief: Corinne Iozzio

Media
“A Trip to the Moon” (1902, Georges Méliès), Pond5, “The Astronomer’s Dream” (1898, Georges Méliès), The Birth of Venus (1485-1486, Sandro Botticelli)

Music
APM Music

Thank You
Helen Cheng, Chester Zarnoch, Erin Chapman, Keiko McNamara (APM Music)

#popularscience #horseshoecrab #horseshoecrabs #arthropod #blueblood #animalmating #animalbehavior #popsci #mating #biology #ocean #love #lovestory #crab #horseshoe #wildlives #science #moon

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8 Comments

8 Comments

  1. Sarah Barker

    May 26, 2022 at 9:39 pm

    “A bicycle helmet looking for love” is a sentence I didn’t think I’d hear today.

  2. Jaak Dol

    May 26, 2022 at 9:54 pm

    Felicidades, es un buen ejemplo. 4 sentadillas son unos SEXopornoo.Uno muchas y un buen ejercicio. Se deja ver que hay muy buenos resultados 😍👍 Saludos desde la Cd.. de world 🌹😉💖 los mortalesy abian apreciado tan hermosa mujer.k

  3. Иван Сочников

    May 26, 2022 at 9:57 pm

    La légende de QUINZAA.Monster snowquen’s est mon idole. C’est la personne que j’aspire à êtreh, c’est ma lumière du jour

  4. Alonzo Marsh

    June 14, 2022 at 5:11 am

    𝓟Ř𝔬𝓂𝔬𝐒ϻ

  5. Saffron4546

    August 18, 2022 at 8:13 am

    I’m here because on a whim I looked up a random Youtube video and found this. Suffice to say, I clicked on it immediately.

  6. Thay The Ong Can

    September 27, 2022 at 12:24 pm

    good video

  7. Jeremy Best

    August 11, 2023 at 7:27 pm

    the way my shit throbbed

  8. Aiden Har

    August 11, 2023 at 7:28 pm

    The way I busted immediately

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The Truth About Quicksand & Release the Tea Kraken | The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week S7E22

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Charlie McDonnell (aka coollike on Twitch) joins the show to talk about a very British energy scandal! Plus, producer Jess Boddy does a segment on if quicksand can really suck you down into the ground like it does in the movies, and Rachel explains how creatures can learn without brains.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science.

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On Weirdest Thing, we take the lofty, noble pursuit of science, and we strive to make it utterly relatable, and extremely entertaining. If you’ve ever wanted to learn about dual-penised serpents, airborne Ford Pintos, chainsaws used for childbirth, or the frozen poopsicle debacle atop Mount Everest, you should definitely take a listen. And if you were even eating a delicious seafood dinner and found yourself wondering if blood-sucking vampire fish make for a tasty meal? Well, we’ve got you covered. Listen to the Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week wherever you get podcasts.


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Sarah Gailey joins the show to talk about how hippo ranching almost became commonplace in the United States. Plus, Sandra talks about giving peacocks vasectomies, and Rachel gets into how Einstein’s brain was pilfered. The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Follow Rachel: Follow Jess: Listen anywhere! Spotify: Apple…

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Sarah Gailey joins the show to talk about how hippo ranching almost became commonplace in the United States. Plus, Sandra talks about giving peacocks vasectomies, and Rachel gets into how Einstein’s brain was pilfered.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science.

Follow Rachel:

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Listen anywhere!
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About the show:
On Weirdest Thing, we take the lofty, noble pursuit of science, and we strive to make it utterly relatable, and extremely entertaining. If you’ve ever wanted to learn about dual-penised serpents, airborne Ford Pintos, chainsaws used for childbirth, or the frozen poopsicle debacle atop Mount Everest, you should definitely take a listen. And if you were even eating a delicious seafood dinner and found yourself wondering if blood-sucking vampire fish make for a tasty meal? Well, we’ve got you covered. Listen to the Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week wherever you get podcasts.


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PopSci’s Laura Baisas hops on Weirdest Thing to talk about ancient tweezers (and their accompanying screams), Rachel explains the state of Leprosy in past, present, and future, and Sara Kiley talks about tools and weapons made from space rocks.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science.

Follow Rachel:

Follow Jess:

Listen anywhere!
Spotify:
Apple Podcasts:
Google Podcasts:
Stitcher:
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About the show:
On Weirdest Thing, we take the lofty, noble pursuit of science, and we strive to make it utterly relatable, and extremely entertaining. If you’ve ever wanted to learn about dual-penised serpents, airborne Ford Pintos, chainsaws used for childbirth, or the frozen poopsicle debacle atop Mount Everest, you should definitely take a listen. And if you were even eating a delicious seafood dinner and found yourself wondering if blood-sucking vampire fish make for a tasty meal? Well, we’ve got you covered. Listen to the Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week wherever you get podcasts.

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