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Defensive Puking, Self-Cooling Curls, Zambia’s Teen Astronauts | Weirdest Thing S7, E17 | PopSci

Scientific Illustrator and Twitch Partner Liz Clayton Fuller joins the podcast to talk about turkey vultures, their defensive puking mechanism, and why you should thank the next one you see. Plus, Rachel explains how a head of curly hair is actually scientifically cooler, and Purbita talks about Zambia’s teen astronaut program. The Weirdest Thing I…

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Scientific Illustrator and Twitch Partner Liz Clayton Fuller joins the podcast to talk about turkey vultures, their defensive puking mechanism, and why you should thank the next one you see. Plus, Rachel explains how a head of curly hair is actually scientifically cooler, and Purbita talks about Zambia’s teen astronaut program.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science.

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On Weirdest Thing, we take the lofty, noble pursuit of science, and we strive to make it utterly relatable, and extremely entertaining. If you’ve ever wanted to learn about dual-penised serpents, airborne Ford Pintos, chainsaws used for childbirth, or the frozen poopsicle debacle atop Mount Everest, you should definitely take a listen. And if you were even eating a delicious seafood dinner and found yourself wondering if blood-sucking vampire fish make for a tasty meal? Well, we’ve got you covered. Listen to the Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week wherever you get podcasts.

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Robert Plummer

    September 28, 2023 at 7:09 pm

    I’m pretty sure someone has said this… however .. It is Saturn (Five).. not Saturn (Vee)… I hope you get to know the Roman Empire and all the awesome things that came out of this… I once wrote a program to convert Roman Numerals into Arabic Numerals and vice versa… Love the show… first time i really felt the need to educate all the awesome science communicators I listen to each and every episode… Keep up the good work!!

  2. @robertplummer9942

    September 28, 2023 at 7:09 pm

    I’m pretty sure someone has said this… however .. It is Saturn (Five).. not Saturn (Vee)… I hope you get to know the Roman Empire and all the awesome things that came out of this… I once wrote a program to convert Roman Numerals into Arabic Numerals and vice versa… Love the show… first time i really felt the need to educate all the awesome science communicators I listen to each and every episode… Keep up the good work!!

  3. Robert Plummer

    September 28, 2023 at 7:12 pm

    Oh, ok.. no one commented here at least… my bad.. I stand corrected about the first part of my comment below before the first ellipse… (…) LOL…

  4. @robertplummer9942

    September 28, 2023 at 7:12 pm

    Oh, ok.. no one commented here at least… my bad.. I stand corrected about the first part of my comment below before the first ellipse… (…) LOL…

  5. Robert Plummer

    September 28, 2023 at 7:39 pm

    Side note : Vultures and other Carrion birds also spread their wings in the sun to kill all the nasty bits that get stuck in their feathers, using the Ultraviolet radiation of the sun to ‘sanitize’ their feathers… not unlike UV water units used by Humans… learn from Momma Nature… she always has an answer for life to do stuff…

  6. @robertplummer9942

    September 28, 2023 at 7:39 pm

    Side note : Vultures and other Carrion birds also spread their wings in the sun to kill all the nasty bits that get stuck in their feathers, using the Ultraviolet radiation of the sun to ‘sanitize’ their feathers… not unlike UV water units used by Humans… learn from Momma Nature… she always has an answer for life to do stuff…

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